The 14 Categories of Disability Under IDEA

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The 14 Categories of Disability Under IDEA da Mind Map: The 14 Categories of Disability Under IDEA

1. Autism

1.1. Tools such as the Autism/DTT app is useful in teaching the basics such as colors, animals, numbers, the alphabet, etc., And a Smartboard for music, song and dance to teach math, phonics and reading is also helpful. Visual graphs, cue cards and flash cards and audiobooks that help the student understand the classroom and all instructions being given plus the material presented.

2. Deaf_blindness

2.1. Tools such as JAWS (Job Access With Speech) -screen reading applications, computer screen magnification software, computer braille translation, braille notetakers and video magnifiers are useful as well as a computer-generated voice (called synthesized speech, or text-to-speech, TTS) that can be used to read back what was written for an individual who cannot see the screen well or at all. Large print books, audio-books and picture books can be used in the classroom. Also, a sensory glove that tracks a 3D object, recognize it and provide a verbal and visual definition for the student.

3. Deafness

3.1. Use visual support in the way of picture books, Tumblebooks Library is a good website, Storybook is another good one where students can create stories and express themselves visually and in writing. Use infographs and other visual aids to organize the classroom and help the student navigate and learn classroom procedures.

4. Developmental delay

4.1. "Program single repeated line stories using a single message communication devices like the BIGmack from AbleNet or the Chipper from Adaptivation. Program simple short stories using a single switch sequential message communication devices like the Step-by-StepCommunicator from AbleNet or the Sequencer from Adaptivation. Create your own stories using talking photoalbums. The Book Worm from AbleNet can make almost any book a talking book, allows voice recording and alternate access to “listen” to the story. Commercially available books on tape or CD, can be controlled by the child by using a single switch adapted cassette or CD player to start and stop the story. Head phones can also be used to enhanced listening. High Tech Solutions: Create simple single switch or mouse click access stories using Microsoft PowerPoint Create your own books using My Own BookShelf which is an authoring program that allows you to create books, and categorize them into bookshelves. Children can pick their books from the bookshelf and read using a variety of access devices. There are many free books available to play and view on line. Some examples are www.storyplace.org, Mighty Books, or www.starfall.com."  http://atclassroom.blogspot.kr/2011/09/assistive-technology-and-early-start.html

5. Visual impairment including blindness

5.1. Tools such as JAWS (Job Access With Speech) -screen reading applications, computer screen magnification software, computer braille translation, braille notetakers and video magnifiers are useful as well as a computer-generated voice (called synthesized speech, or text-to-speech, TTS) that can be used to read back what was written for an individual who cannot see the screen well or at all. Large print books, audio-books and picture books can be used in the classroom. Also, a sensory glove that tracks a 3D object, recognize it and provide a verbal and visual definition for the student. Still, a combination of tools such as

6. Traumatic brain injury

6.1. Classroom tools such as large print books, audiobooks with e-support, picture books, handheld microcomputers - or smartphones - that notify verbally or audibly a student's schedule or to do list can all assist students with brain injuries int he classroom. Teachers can teach material in small steps using a variety of visual, audio and body language to explain instruction and present material.

7. Speech or language impairment

7.1. Several tools such as Assistive listening devices (ALDs) help amplify sounds for students while omitting background noises. ALDs can be used with a hearing aid or cochlear implant to help a wearer hear certain sounds better. Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices help people with communication disorders to express themselves. These devices can range from a simple picture board to a computer program that synthesizes speech from text. Alerting devices connect to a doorbell, telephone, or alarm that emits a loud sound or blinking light to let someone with hearing loss know that an event is taking place. https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/assistive-devices-people-hearing-voice-speech-or-language-disorders

8. Specific learning disability

8.1. Classroom tools such as large print books, audiobooks with e-support, picture books, handheld microcomputers - or smartphones - that notify verbally or audibly a student's schedule or to do list can all assist students with brain injuries int he classroom. Teachers can teach material in small steps using a variety of visual, audio and body language to explain instruction and present material.

9. Other health impairment

9.1. Students with disabilities that are difficult to define or complex in nature can be made comfortable by providing an area of the classroom where they can go if they become overwhelmed. A variety of visual and audio material should be used to teach instruction, classroom rules and behavioral norms. As well, the teacher can teach in small steps using a variety of explanation techniques to present materials.

10. Orthopedic impairment

10.1. One tool that could assist students with orthopedic disabilities in the classroom is a multipurpose chair that is equipped with remote controls to turn on/off their laptop, turn up/down volume, open/close and manipulate tools for programs on the computer, open doors, windows, turn on and off lights. This kind of chair would make the student more independent in the classroom. Teachers can ensure that all materials are reachable from a wheelchair perspective and all visuals are at a height that students who cannot stand are able to see.

11. Multiple disabilities

11.1. Use visual support in the way of picture books, audiobooks with e-support, infographs and other visual aids to organize the classroom and help the student navigate and learn classroom procedures. Break down learning into small steps and use a variety of methods to explain instructions.

11.1.1. Sometimes students have more than one disability making technology use limited. Still, a combination of tools such as screen reading applications, computer screen magnification software, computer braille translation, braille notetakers and video magnifiers. Also, Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices help people with communication disorders to express themselves. These devices can range from a simple picture board to a computer program that synthesizes speech from text.

12. Intellectual disability

12.1. In the classroom, tools such as audio books and eText supports for reading and listening comprehension. •  Smart Boards in combination with computer-assisted software (e.g., digital flash cards to improve sight words). •  Personal digital assistants. •  Graphic organizers. •  Screen magnifiers.  Money Equivalence is an example of an app that teaches about money equivalents and combinations of coins and bills) and Autism/DTT Shapes (teaches basic shapes using a discrete trial training technique).

13. Emotional disturbance

13.1. Use Colour-coded Behavior Charts that allow students to visually see behavior changes and positive reactions.  Use Point Sheets that allow students to keep track of positive reinforcements and can be a great motivational tool. Keep classroom colours muted or soft, allow the student a quiet area where noise is reduced or provide headsets or earmuffs to reduce disturbing noises.

14. Hearing impairment

14.1. Use visual support in the way of picture books, Tumblebooks Library is a good website, Storybook is another good one where students can create stories and express themselves visually and in writing. Use infographs and other visual aids to organize the classroom and help the student navigate and learn classroom procedures.