(July 31)  Mark 14:32-52 THe agony of Christ

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(July 31)  Mark 14:32-52 THe agony of Christ by Mind Map: (July 31)  Mark 14:32-52 THe agony of Christ

1. #3 - The Hope of His Agony

1.1. (51-52) Anonymous follow flees naked - The garden

1.2. what is this?

1.2.1. Since only Mark records it, many have speculated that the Evangelist injects his own intimate memory of the scene. Some regard it as Mark’s remorseful signature, akin to Alfred Hitchcock’s fleeting appearances in his own films. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 547). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.2. Amos 2: 16, which refers to flight on the Day of the Lord: “‘ Even the bravest warriors will flee naked on that day,’ declares the LORD.” Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 547). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.2.2.1. ie. a statement of who all fled, at ALL cost

1.2.3. The young man’s escape reflects the “every man for himself, save yourself if you can” mindset that swept through the followers of Jesus Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 548). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

1.3. In that moment ... why? Why is this happening?

1.4. naked

1.4.1. "poorly clothed"

1.4.1.1. James 2:15

1.4.1.2. Matt's parable - when did we see you naked and not clothe you?

1.5. Mark?

1.5.1. Several Fathers of the Church conjectured that the young man was Mark himself, who is known to have been a resident in Jerusalem (Acts 12:12) and in whose house, it was held by tradition, Jesus celebrated the paschal meal. 107 If this is correct, Mark was an eyewitness to the transactions in Gethsemane. His primary purpose for including this vignette, however, appears to have been to emphasize the fact that all fled, leaving Jesus alone in the custody of the police. No one remained with Jesus, not even a valiant young man who intended to follow him. William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5546-5549). Kindle Edition.

1.6. N.T. Wright, in his little commentary on Mark, says by having this young man flee naked from the garden, Mark is trying to remind us about another garden. You see, in the garden of Eden, there were people who were given a test, and they failed. They were stripped naked, and they fled in shame. Now here we are, centuries later, and there’s a garden, and there’s a test, and everybody is failing. Everybody is failing, and they’re stripped naked, and they’re leaving in shame. But wait a minute. Something is different. In the middle of this garden, there’s a human being who is passing the test, and it’s an incredible test, because, if you think about it … Think of this. Why were all these other people fleeing? Why were all these other people failing? They’re afraid of the world’s sword. They’re afraid of the sword. They’re afraid somebody’s going to arrest them. They’re afraid somebody is going to kill them. They’re afraid of the world’s sword. But Jesus Christ is standing firm, and he’s facing something even worse than the world’s sword. When Adam and Eve fled naked from the garden, just covered with fig leaves, they turned around and they realized there was something at the door keeping them from ever going back. Do you remember what it was? A sword. An archangel, a cherubim, had a flaming sword that was turning left and right. No one could get back into the presence of God without going under that sword. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.6.1. What was that sword?

1.6.1.1. What was that sword? It’s the divine justice. Our sins separate us from God. There’s no way back into the presence of God unless someone takes this sort of divine justice. We were in that garden just facing the little sword of the world, and we ran. Jesus was in that garden, facing the ultimate sword of divine justice, and he stood firm for me and for you.

1.7. Substitute

1.7.1. Here’s the secret. If you see Jesus Christ just reversing places with others, you see him healing the leper and caring for the poor … If you just see him reversing places with others and forgiving his enemies, you’ll say, “I can’t do that.” You’re right. You can’t, because Jesus Christ as an example will crush you, but Jesus Christ as a substitute will save you. If you see Jesus Christ as an example, reversing places with others, you’ll never live up to that. But if you see Jesus Christ reversing places with you and me in the garden … See, they’re all going free, even though they’ve disobeyed, and he’s being seized even though he obeys. He has shifted places with us. He’s getting what we deserve so we can get what he deserves. When you see the great reversal is you and him, not just him and other people … If you see he gave up all of his cosmic wealth and came into our poverty so we could be spiritually rich … If you see he gave up the name which is above every name and came into our anonymity so we could get God’s name put on us, you’re going to look at your reputation differently.

1.8. This is a visitation of a garden

1.8.1. Just as rebellion in a garden brought Death's reign over man (Gen. 3:1-19), submission in Gethsemane reversed that pattern of rebellion and sets in motion a sequence of events which defeated Death itself (cf. Heb. 5:7-10). William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5493-5494). Kindle Edition.

1.8.2. A man in a garden

1.8.3. Surrounded by trees

1.8.4. Wrestling with God's will

1.8.5. A lot on th eline

1.8.6. Soon a garden, where death will have lost will be seen

1.8.7. Now Jesus Christ comes and he, according to 1 Corinthians and according to Paul, is the second Adam. He’s our substitute; he’s our representative. And guess what? He comes into a garden too. A second garden. God asks him to obey about a tree as well, only this time the tree is a cross. Oh my goodness … You see how much harder, how much infinitely harder, it’s going to be for the second Adam than for the first. Because the first Adam was told, “Obey me about the tree and you will live,” and he didn’t. He didn’t obey. But God comes to the second Adam and says, “Obey me about the tree and I will crush you to powder,” and he did. He obeyed. Why? Because he loved us. Because he would rather lose himself than lose us. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

1.9. ILL: Italian captain?

1.10. Jesus given over but God did it

1.10.1. Romans 8:32

1.10.2. narrative of

2. Intro

2.1. HOOK

2.1.1. ILL: In my years as a pastor / assistant pastor, I've done countless, countless weddings but only one funeral.

2.1.1.1. Story ...

2.1.1.2. Death ...

2.1.1.3. Agony ...

2.1.1.4. Yell ...

2.2. Connection

2.2.1. That image is forever embedded in my mind. And I think of that when I think of this passage

2.2.2. All throughout the gospel of Mark we have seen Jesus in control. In all that he says and does, he is calm, level headed, he has proceeded through the first 14 chapters unfazed by the chaos around him, by the plotting against him, and by the demands of him.

2.2.2.1. Whether it has been human opposition, demonic foes, raging storms, Jesus has been presented in a way that was identifiable in the Greeco-Roman world.

2.2.2.2. You see, heroes then were often painted as Socrates would have us believe courage should look like - calm, collected, unfazed.

2.2.2.3. When heroes had a task to do, they did it. They didn't cry about it. They didnt' wine about it. They didn't get moved by it!

2.2.2.4. And so in a lot of ways, that's how we have seen jesus.

2.2.2.4.1. Ex. mark 5 - the death of Jarius' daughter  and commotion

2.2.2.4.2. Mark 5:38–42 (ESV) — 38 They came to the house of the ruler of the synagogue, and Jesus saw a commotion, people weeping and wailing loudly. 39 And when he had entered, he said to them, “Why are you making a commotion and weeping? The child is not dead but sleeping.” 40 And they laughed at him. But he put them all outside and took the child’s father and mother and those who were with him and went in where the child was. 41 Taking her by the hand he said to her, “Talitha cumi,” which means, “Little girl, I say to you, arise.” 42 And immediately the girl got up and began walking (for she was twelve years of age), and they were immediately overcome with amazement.

2.2.3. But now, we come to this chapter, and this chapter we don't get a picture of a calm and collected jesus. No no. What we get is Jesus on the other end. Jesus is distressed. JEsus is troubled. Jesus is sorrowful. And here is Jesus, more like a MOTHER in a hospital room yelling out in despair than a stoic Greeco-Roman hero... to the point of verse 34 and 45 ....

2.2.3.1. Mark 14:34–35 (ESV) — 34 And he said to them, “My soul is very sorrowful, even to death. Remain here and watch.” 35 And going a little farther, he fell on the ground and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from him.

2.2.3.2. There is more emotion, more anguish, more lament in this passage than we will see at the cross.

2.2.4. Here is where we see Christ the man. Here is where we feel the betrayal, the abandonment. Here is where we discover that Jesus can comfort us in our PAIN, in our SUFFERING - because here is where Jesus is shown vulnerable

2.3. Title

2.3.1. The Agony of Christ

2.3.1.1. The extent of his agony

2.3.1.2. The cause of his agony

2.3.1.3. The hope of his agony

3. #1 - The Extent Of his Agony (32-41a)

3.1. Background REview

3.1.1. Thursday night of last week

3.1.2. Wed - has eaten Passover meal with the disciples

3.1.3. Predicted one will betray me

3.1.4. Then left and head to mt of olives (26) singing a hymn - likely the praise hymns

3.1.5. He has said - you will all fall away.

3.1.5.1. Peter no

3.1.5.2. I will die for you

3.1.5.3. All say that

3.1.6. So there's real reason to REJOICE HERE!!!

3.1.6.1. Passover celebration

3.1.6.2. Hymn

3.1.6.3. Buddeis reaffirmed.

3.2. But they are headed to a place called Gethsamei

3.2.1. Mark 14:32 (ESV) — 32 And they went to a place called Gethsemane.....

3.2.2. In Mt of olives

3.2.3. Common Familiar place

3.2.3.1. John 18:2 (ESV) — 2 Now Judas, who betrayed him, also knew the place, for Jesus often met there with his disciples.

3.2.4. Gethsamne = Oil Press

3.2.4.1. Show Picture

3.2.4.2. Appropriate for his suffering

3.3. Companions in prayer

3.3.1. Mark 14:32–33 (ESV) — 32 ... And he said to his disciples, “Sit here while I pray.” 33 And he took with him Peter and James and John, and began to be greatly distressed and troubled.

3.3.2. Perhaps not for his own loneliness, bt for their own preparations,a nd part of that is because he leaves them to pray.

3.4. His agony

3.4.1. began

3.4.2. greatly distressed and troubled

3.4.2.1. The unusually strong language indicates that Mark understood Gethsemane to be the critical moment in Jesus' life when the full meaning of his submission to the Father confronted him with its immediacy. William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5418-5419). Kindle Edition.

3.4.2.2. "greatly distressed and troubled"

3.4.2.2.1. It is rather the horror of the one who lives wholly for the Father at the prospect of the alienation from God which is entailed in the judgment ment upon sin which Jesus assumes. William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5424-5425). Kindle Edition.

3.4.2.2.2. irst of all, it says, “… he began to be deeply distressed …” Now, that’s a word that actually means astonished, and that’s astonishing! If you read the rest of the life of Jesus Christ, nothing ever seems to surprise him. He’s totally unflappable, but it says here, “Suddenly he began to be astonished.” Something he saw, something he realized, something he experienced stunned the eternal Son of God and sent him reeling; it shocked him. What could that have been? We’ll get to that. Secondly, it says, “… he began to be deeply distressed and troubled.” This word troubled means to be overcome with horror. Let’s not think about this illustration too long, but just to give you an understanding of what he was experiencing, imagine you’re walking down the street; you turn a corner and there in front of you is someone you love, killed, dead, mutilated, cut to pieces. How do you feel? Nausea. Your fear is like a physical cloud rising up to choke you. That’s horror and that’s what he was experiencing. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.4.2.2.3. This word troubled means to be overcome with horror. Let’s not think about this illustration too long, but just to give you an understanding of what he was experiencing, imagine you’re walking down the street; you turn a corner and there in front of you is someone you love, killed, dead, mutilated, cut to pieces. How do you feel? Nausea. Your fear is like a physical cloud rising up to choke you. That’s horror and that’s what he was experiencing. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.4.2.3. Jesus becomes extremely distressed and dismayed, or to translate these verbs more literally, he is shuddering in distress tress and is appalled and anguishing.73 Ben Witherington III. The Gospel of Mark: A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary (Kindle Location 5678). Kindle Edition.

3.4.3. "sorrowful, even to death"

3.4.3.1. "' My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death'" echoes the haunting lament of the downcast and dejected soul of Pss 42: 6, 12 and 43: 5. Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7699-7700). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

3.4.3.2. "overwhelmed with sorrow" (perilypos), again a rare word, means "burdened with grief," Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Location 7700). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

3.4.3.3. Nothing in all the Bible compares to Jesus' agony and anguish in Gethsemane — neither the laments of the Psalms, nor the broken heart of Abraham as he prepared to sacrifice his son Isaac (Gen 22: 5), nor David's grief at the death of his son Absalom (2 Sam 18: 33). Luke 22: 44 even speaks of Jesus' "sweat falling to the ground like drops of blood" (so, too, Justin Martyr, Dial. Trypho 103.8). The suffering of Gethsemane left an indelible imprint on the early church (Heb 5: 7). Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7702-7705). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

3.4.3.4. What we have here in verse 34 is him actually coming right out and saying so! He says, “My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death …” He’s saying, “I’m so crushed with horror and sorrow and grief, I feel I’m about to die on the spot. I could.” That’s what he’s saying. Up to now, Jesus has totally been in control and suddenly, really suddenly in verse 33, he begins to fall apart. He’s agonizing. He’s struggling. He can’t face it. He’s violently crying. Why? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.4.4. Fell on the ground ... if it is possible

3.4.5. The gospel of Luke (ch 22) all of this is so much that an angel has to come and strengthen him. Then he prays again and he starts to sweat drops of blood.

3.5. In waiting - passion

3.5.1. We have already stressed that the word ‘passion’ does not mean, exclusively or even primarily, ‘pain’: it means dependence, exposure, waiting, being no longer in control of one’s own situation, being the object of what is done. So the passion of Jesus ‘connects’ not simply or even primarily with the human experience of pain: it connects with every experience of passing, suddenly or gradually, into a more dependent phase or area of life— with going into hospital, with retiring or losing one’s job or having to wait upon the actions of other people and other factors beyond one’s control. If the thought of the passion of Jesus is helpful at all, then it may be helpful not only to the person who is bearing the ‘cross’ of pain but also to the person who feels that he is ‘on the sidelines’, that he has become useless or ineffective, that he is no longer making his mark in the world or Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 1126-1132). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

3.5.1.1. ‘To be handed over’ in ways such as these is particularly disquieting to a person who, by habit or temperament, has been exceptionally active and energetic or a notable achiever; and such a person may well find comfort in the thought that a similar pattern appears in the life of Jesus— that He also passed from activity and work and achievement into a final phase of waiting and dependence and passion. Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 1133-1135). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

3.5.2. The suffering of waiting

3.5.2.1. In Gethsemane Jesus must wait. Wait for the hour to come upon him, wait for the betrayer to come at any moment. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 553). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.5.2.2. Vanstone

3.5.2.3. *** waiting with dread and hope

3.5.2.3.1. It is the manner of waiting in which the prisoner in the dock— or the prisoner’s wife or mother— waits for the jury to announce their verdict; the manner in which an intelligent man waits for the surgeon’s report on a biopsy of his liver; the manner in which, after an explosion in a coalmine, a wife waits at the pit-head to hear if her own man is safe. One waits at such moments in an agonizing tension between hope and dread, stretched and almost torn apart between two dramatically different anticipations. A wise person will then steel and prepare himself for the worst; but the very tension in which he waits shows that hope is still present, and that hope will often express itself in unbelievers, in the urgent and secret prayer, “O God, let it be all right.” In such hope and prayer there is no weakness, no failure of nerve: torn between rational hope and rational dread one may properly pray for the best while still prepared for the worst. 35 W. H. Vanstone, The Stature of Waiting (New York: Seabury, 1983), 83– 85. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) . Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.5.2.4. that Jesus waited and prayed in such a way. He had already handed himself over to death when he acted and taught as he did in the temple. He had brought his proclamation of God’s reign to the seat of human power. Now he must change from the one who acts to the one who waits and is acted upon. This change is one of the hardest things to accept in life— to become passive after a life of active involvement, to be at the mercy of others. Mark’s readers need not shy from crying to God to be spared from their own cross that they must bear, but they can learn from Jesus to accept God’s plan through prayer. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 554). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.5.3. According to Mark, from the time when Jesus was handed over until the moment when He died, He said nothing decisive and did nothing at all. According to Mark’s account, the centurion would not and could not have seen anything remarkable in what Jesus said or did: for there was nothing such to be seen. All that he could have seen, all that there was to be seen, was what was done to Jesus: the figure before his eyes was simply done to, exposed to whatever the people around Him might say or do. There is nothing in Mark’s account to suggest to the reader that the centurion has observed great heroism or patience on Jesus’ part, or that he has seen portents or supernatural events which might be thought to indicate the passing of a ‘god’; Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 1161-1166). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

3.5.4. According to Mark, the passion of Jesus was not His human misfortune: it was the decisive manifestation of His divinity. Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 1170-1171). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

3.5.5. We must insist that, according to Mark, the centurion saw nothing but Jesus ‘being done to’, and that it is from this perception that the testimony emerges that Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 1168-1169). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

3.6. Prayer of lament

3.6.1. full of agony

3.6.2. Pyschological anguish befor ethe physical anguish

3.6.2.1. It's interesting to note the calmness while in the trial / suffering compared to the anguish here

3.6.3. Senior notes that one’s prayer is not “fully controlled, or strained with politeness. In a rush of emotion, complaint, and even recrimination, the believers pour out their hearts to God.” Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 540). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.7. We struggle with this imagery of Jesus

3.7.1. Francis watson

3.7.1.1. “Christian piety, both ancient and modern, has tended to find these passages offensive and distasteful.” Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 548). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.7.2. Orthodox Christians confess Jesus to be fully human and fully divine. Mark’s scene makes it clear that Jesus experienced a full range of human emotions. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 549). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.7.3. Ignatius - describs Jesus as one "who cannot suffer"

3.7.4. Celsus used this to prove Jesus was not divine (Garland)

3.7.5. Even asks for cup to be removed

3.7.6. Isaiah 53:4–5 (ESV) — 4 Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted. 5 But he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his wounds we are healed.

3.8. What we learn

3.8.1. All of Jesus followers die better than jeuss?

3.8.1.1. This is essentially what Polycarp said (there were people around and they wrote it down). He said, “The fire you speak of lasts but an hour and is quenched with a little. But what do you know of the fire of judgment? So come. Why delay? Do what you will.” Do you see Jesus saying, “Come on nails, thorns, spear. Come on!” No. I have a question; why is it that almost all of Jesus’ followers have died better than Jesus? Isn’t that an interesting question? They almost all have died better than Jesus. Jesus is struggling; he can hardly handle it. Why? Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

3.8.2. What does this teach us lead us to?

3.8.3. Aren't you glad we have this picture of jesus? Aren't you glad we are shown that suffering and going through the dark night of the soul is not a sin.

3.8.3.1. it says that anguish is not anxiety, it says that suffering is not sin, it says that distressed and troubled to the point of death is not a lack of faith, but rather an acknowledgement that the world we live in and the experiences it offers us is wrong, is broken, is marred be blackness of sin and overshadowed by the tyrant of death. When we process our suffering we say what is essentially needed to be said to pave the way for the gospel - and that is - this is not how it ought to be.

3.8.3.1.1. ILL: Spurgeon

3.8.3.1.2. “That Jesus went through pain is a continuing source of comfort and courage to pain-stricken people.” Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 554). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

3.8.4. Peck writes, “Once suffering is completely accepted, it ceases in a sense to be suffering.” 33 It is the time of waiting that can do us in. M. Scott Peck, The Road Less Travelled (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979), 75. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) . Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4. #2 - The Cause of His Agony (41b-49)

4.1. God's will

4.1.1. ILL: Malchus - God's will

4.2. obedience is not always joyful!

4.3. v36

4.3.1. why the anguish? We are not sure ...

4.3.1.1. The thought of the weight of the worlds sins upon him

4.3.1.1.1. 2 Corinthians 5:21 (ESV) — 21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

4.3.1.2. The cursed death on a cross

4.3.1.2.1. Galatians 3:13 (ESV) — 13 Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree”—

4.3.1.3. Anguish for his disciples and what they will go through

4.3.1.3.1. John 17

4.3.1.4. All we can safely say is that in Gethsemane Jesus was following his own teaching. He taught the disciples to pray, “Lead us not into temptation [testing], but deliver us from the evil one” (Matt. 6: 13), and he practiced what he taught. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 550). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.3.2. In linking verse 34 to 36, what we discover is this --- that though the path of sorrrow feels like it leads us to the destination of death, it may very well lead us to the place of

4.3.2.1. place of intimacy

4.3.2.1.1. abba, Father

4.3.2.2. Place of knowing God for God

4.3.2.2.1. All things are possible

4.3.2.3. Place of honesty

4.3.2.3.1. Let this cup pass from me

4.3.2.3.2. Godliness is not phoniness. It's ok to pray and ask and Jesus seems to really push this in the gospels

4.3.2.3.3. Prayers asking God to have a change of mind are not considered insubordinate but actually exude trust that God listens to prayer and grants requests that can be reconciled “with overall Providence.” Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 540). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.3.2.4. Place of submission

4.3.3. 36 - A prayer  and plea and surrender

4.3.3.1. Mark 14:36 (ESV) — 36 And he said, “Abba, Father, all things are possible for you. Remove this cup from me. Yet not what I will, but what you will.”

4.3.3.2. aba

4.3.3.2.1. address in the informal familial language -

4.3.3.2.2. NOt quite "daddy" as a little kid (France) but rather an intimate name within a patriarchal socieity

4.3.3.2.3. for in the literature of early Palestinian tinian Judaism there is no evidence of Abba being used as a personal address to God. William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5438-5439). Kindle Edition.

4.3.3.2.4. Contrary to Wright, Jesus was very aware that god was his father

4.3.3.3. Remove this cup

4.3.3.3.1. Jesus’ grappling with God’s will reveals that he is not “a joyful martyr bent on self destruction, not an unwilling pawn forced into sacrifice  …   he is a courageous hero who knows what dangers lie ahead and resolves to do the will of God (see 3: 35).” 28 The cross is God’s decision for him. It comes to him as a cup that needs to be drunk. He must be obedient, but he does not relish the conflict or the prospect of death. Jesus Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 551). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.3.3.3.2. Throughout his ministry he has disavowed every exit ramp from the pathway of suffering servanthood, including the temptation to remain with Moses and Elijah in glory (9: 2-8). His will conforms to his knowledge of God's will, to undergo the "baptism" (10: 38), to accept the "cup" (v. 36), to meet the "hour" (v. 35). In words reminiscent of the prayer he earlier taught the disciples (Matt 6: 10), "' Not what I will, but what you will.'" Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7739-7742). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

4.3.3.3.3. This idea that the father can take it away but may chose not to expresses what mark it strying to establish - that the entirety of his death is owed to by the father

4.3.3.3.4. Cup of wrath

4.3.3.3.5. Eze 23 - Cup of wrath

4.3.3.3.6. Isa 51

4.3.3.4. prayer

4.3.3.4.1. God can answer every prayer request but we should not assume he will

4.3.3.4.2. The point her is that there is a tension in asking... not like "it doesn't matter" ... but in asking we accept His will

4.3.3.5. Cup

4.3.3.5.1. Mark 10:38–39 (ESV) — 38 Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Are you able to drink the cup that I drink, or to be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” 39 And they said to him, “We are able.” And Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized,

4.3.3.5.2. Taken from the vocabulary of apocalyptic literature, "hour" and "cup" speak of the ultimate purposes of God associated with the end of time (13: 32; Dan 11: 40, 45). They do not here refer to Jesus' impending arrest but to his messianic destiny as "' the ransom for many'" (10: 45) and "' the handing over of the Son of Man to sinners'" (v. 41) in order to redeem sinners. Edwards Jr., James R.. The Gospel according to Mark (The Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC)) (Kindle Locations 7722-7725). Eerdmans Publishing Co - A. Kindle Edition.

4.3.3.6. SUMMARY:

4.3.3.6.1. Abba leads to honesty - "remove this cup"

4.3.3.6.2. "all thigns are possible for you" - leads to "not what I will but what you will"

4.4. (37-41) Sleeping in prayer

4.4.1. 3 times like Peters denial

4.4.2. Sleep

4.4.2.1. meaning according to Garland

4.4.2.1.1. To sleep is to stop praying. We often do not pray because we are unaware that we are in the midst of trial. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 555). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.4.2.1.2. To sleep is to be unable to recognize the onset of trial or to accept it as God’s will. The disciples heard only what they wanted to hear and tuned out Jesus’ teaching on the necessity of suffering and the requirement of taking up a cross. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 555). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.4.2.1.3. To sleep is to assume that we have arrived (see Phil. 3: 12– 16). Leo Tolstoy’s short story “Father Sergius” portrays a man who took up the monastic life and quickly excelled all others. He regarded the spiritual life as a checklist of tasks and goals to be accomplished. He reached the point where he believed he had accomplished all his goals. He had “learnt all there was to learn and had attained all there was to attain, there was nothing more to do.” 41 The sudden arrival of the hour of trial can be a cruel reminder how mistaken false confidence in past spiritual achievements is. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 556). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.4.2.2. In John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, when Pilgrim finally releases his burden at the foot of the cross and goes a little further, he finds three men fast asleep with fetters on their legs. The name of one was Simple, the second Sloth, and the third Presumption. He awoke them and they spoke. Simple said, “I see no danger”; Sloth said, “Yet a little more sleep”; and Presumption said, “Every tub must stand on its own bottom.” Spiritual drowsiness is dangerous and will prove the Christian’s undoing. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 555). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.4.3. Jesus checks on them 3 times

4.4.3.1. To sleep is to presume that the Spirit is willing without being mindful of the weakness of the flesh. Jesus does not want bravado from his disciples. Their bravado only masked their weakness and kept them from asking for God’s help. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 555). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.4.3.2. That the disciples failed to share in Jesus' sufferings was thoroughly predictable able (Ch. 14:27). The remarkable element in the scene is that in the midst of an unparalleled agony Jesus twice more came to look after his three vulnerable disciples and to warn them of their danger of failure in the struggle which was about to overwhelm them. William L. Lane. The Gospel of Mark (Kindle Locations 5457-5459). Kindle Edition.

4.4.4. "it is enough"

4.4.4.1. "It is settled"

4.4.4.1.1. Interpreted in light of

4.4.5. "the hour has come"

4.4.5.1. God has now turned Jesus over

4.4.5.1.1. Romans 8:32 (ESV) — 32 He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?

4.5. Friends abandon

4.5.1. Judas

4.5.2. (44-45) A kiss of betrayal

4.5.2.1. The betrayer

4.5.2.1.1. What Judas offered to do may have been welcomed as a convenience by the opponents of Jesus, but it can hardly have been regarded as a necessity. So if Judas had made no offer the last events of the life of Jesus would have proceeded in very much the same way. Judas’ deed was certainly shameful; but it did no more to change the course of history or to bring about the death of Jesus than did Peter’s denial or the somnolence of the three disciples who were set to watch in the Garden of Gethsemane or the later flight of the whole band. Vanstone, W. H.. The Stature of Waiting (Kindle Locations 75-79). Church Publishing Inc.. Kindle Edition.

4.5.2.2. 45

4.5.2.2.1. He kissed him

4.5.2.2.2. Rabbi

4.5.2.2.3. ILL: Joab's killing of Amasa

4.5.3. (43) The scene

4.5.3.1. With him a crowd with swords and clubs, FROM the chief priests and the scribes and the elders

4.5.3.1.1. Ironically, Jesus castigated the temple for being a robber’s den instead of a house of prayer for all nations (11: 17). Now temple goons arrest him in the middle of his prayer, as if he is a robber. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 544). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.5.3.2. chief priests and scribes and elders

4.5.3.2.1. same group as in the prediction in 8:31

4.5.4. Abandoned by followers (50-52)

4.5.4.1. (50) Discipels flee

4.5.4.1.1. They All left him

4.5.4.1.2. Fled

4.5.4.2. Main point

4.5.4.2.1. At the moment disciples can make good what they would do, the could not

4.5.4.2.2. This is us.

4.5.5. Disciples

4.5.6. (46-49) Seizing of Jesus

4.5.6.1. 49

4.5.6.1.1. Let the scriptures be fullfilled

4.5.6.2. 48Come out to me as robbers

4.5.6.2.1. ironic as he will be hung between two robbers

4.5.6.3. God’s power is made manifest through weakness. Jesus has eaten with sinners, extending God’s mercy and forgiveness to them (2: 15– 17); now he will be killed by sinners. His death, however, again presents God’s offer of mercy and forgiveness to sinners. Garland, David E.. Mark (The NIV Application Commentary Book 2) (p. 546). Zondervan. Kindle Edition.

4.5.7. Streaker

5. conclusion

5.1. This is a story of love

5.1.1. He lived a perfect life and at the end of his life, he did the single greatest act of love and obedience in the history of the universe, fully knowing what it was going to cost him because God let him see in the garden of Gethsemane what it was going to cost him. No ignorance at all, fully knowing what it was going to cost him, he loved you and me. He obeyed his Father. It was the greatest act of fulfillment of the law of God in history. You and I disobey the law; we deserve the curse. He obeyed the law; he deserves the blessing. But you get his blessing and he gets our curse! “God made him sin who knew no sin, that we might become the righteousness of God in him.” On the cross he takes the curse for our life and when you receive him by faith, you get the blessing for his. He did it at infinite cost to himself. Do you see that? If you see that, you’ll know this: that’s the love you’ve been looking for all your life. No family love, no friend love, no mother love, no spousal love, no romantic love, no professional acclaim, nothing could possibly satisfy you like that. All those other kinds of love will let you down and this one will not. Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

5.1.2. Keller - to be known and loved ....

5.2. Tim Keller notes that every major religious leaders died of old age.. etc. But who follows the death of a young man in failure?

5.2.1. And yet that is where Marks story is leading us.

5.2.2. ommentators and historians have said this for years; I just want to drive it home here. If you were a leader in the early church and you were making up stories about Jesus’ life in order to promote your religion, you never, never would have made this story up. Never. It could only hurt, because no matter what your culture was, whether it was Jewish, Greek, or Roman, no matter what, no culture understood greatness or understood major leaders who were worthy of loyalty and faithfulness acting like this. The only possible reason this account is written down, the only possible explanation for this account being in the gospel of Mark is if it happened. There’s no other motivation possible for including it unless it happened. Therefore, it happened! When we read these accounts of the end of Jesus’ life, don’t try to slither out from under it, saying who knows if it really happened. It happened; deal with it! Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

5.2.3. in our worlds eyes, that's failure!

5.2.4. But what's more ... we not only celebrate winners, but there's a calmness, stoicness to our heroes, is there not?

5.2.4.1. Well, this passage, Jesus facing his death, is unique in ancient literature. Greeks and Romans have lots of stories of their prominent leaders and prominent individuals and figures and heroes facing death and dying. They always were cool and dispassionate, like Socrates. You know, he had to drink the hemlock; he was executed. In the story of his end, he was surrounded by his followers, but he’s cool and dispassionate. He’s cracking jokes almost, speaking ironically. Then you can go to the Jewish culture and Jewish literature. Go to 1 and 2 Maccabees, which is roughly at this time, and you’ll see when Jews wrote accounts of their major figures and heroes and leaders facing death, they weren’t cool and compassionate like the Greeks. They were hot-blooded and fearless and they praised God as they were being sliced to bits by their persecutors. Nothing is like this; nothing in ancient literature is like this. Here you have Jesus just before he’s about to die, opening his heart to his disciples, opening his heart to God, opening his heart to the readers, of course, and talking about his struggles and his agony and his fears about facing death. Then he turns to God and says, “Is there any way I can be left off the hook? Is there any way I can get out from this mission?” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

5.2.4.2. And such was Jesus in trail and on cross...

5.2.4.3. but not ehre. Not in this garden. Not in this moment

5.3. This is a story that helps

5.3.1. When you see that, you’ll be able to trust the Father in your suffering and instead of squelching your desires or changing your circumstances, you’ll go through that suffering, you’ll love into that suffering and it will make you something great. That’s how you do it. This story of Jesus in the garden is like a treasure chest, or it might be like a medicine chest. Are you feeling abandoned? Do you feel like, “God has abandoned me!” Wrong! If he didn’t abandon you under these circumstances, why would he abandon you now? Jesus was truly abandoned by God on the cross so you could just feel abandoned when you go through your troubles, but you’re not. Are you feeling guilty? Are you saying, “Oh, I think God has given up on me!” Look … if he wouldn’t give up on you when hell itself was coming down into his heart, why would he give up on you because you’ve blown it this week? You say, “Oh, I have people in my life who are falling asleep on me. I’ve had it. People who I’ve asked to agonize with me through my problems and they’ve deserted me. I have people in my life who are hard to love and I don’t want to love them anymore.” Look at Jesus. Totally let down, totally abandoned, they fall asleep on him, and what does he say? Does he say, “I hate you! I’ve had it with you”? No, what does he say? “The spirit is willing but the body is weak.” He’s finding something good to say! At a time like that he says, “I know you meant well.” Keller, T. J. (2013). The Timothy Keller Sermon Archive. New York City: Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

5.4. God is in control from beginning to end here

5.5. ILL: Tracey ...

5.6. Suffering is part of the human experience and god does not always answer the we want nor wish

5.6.1. c. ILLUSTRATIONS >> One of my favorite stories from the early church is this monk named telemachus Telemachus was a monk who lived in the 4th century. He felt God saying to him, "Go to Rome." He was in a cloistered monastery. He put his possessions in a sack and set out for Rome. When he arrived in the city, people were thronging in the streets. He asked why all the excitement and was told that this was the day that the gladiators would be fighting and killing each other in the coliseum, the day of the games, the circus.  He thought to himself, "Four centuries after Christ and they are still killing each other, for enjoyment?" He ran to the coliseum and heard the gladiators saying, "Hail to Ceasar, we die for Ceasar" and he thought, "this isn't right." He jumped over the railing and went out into the middle of the field, got between two gladiators, held up his hands and said "In the name of Christ, forbear." The crowd protested and began to shout, "Run him through, Run him through." A gladiator came over and hit him in the stomach with the back of his sword. It sent him sprawling in the sand. He got up and ran back and again said, "In the name of Christ, forbear." The crowd continued to chant, "Run him through." One gladiator came over and plunged his sword through the little monk's stomach and he fell into the sand, which began to turn crimson with his blood. One last time he gasped out, "In the name of Christ forbear." A hush came over the 80,000 people in the coliseum. Soon a man stood and left, then another and more, and within minutes all 80,000 had emptied out of the arena. It was the last known gladiatorial contest in the history of Rome