My Foundations of Education

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My Foundations of Education by Mind Map: My Foundations of Education

1. Politics of Education

1.1. Educational Problems

1.1.1. 1. The Decline of Values or of Civiliation

1.1.2. 2. The Decline of Authority

1.2. Educational Policy and Reform

1.2.1. 1. Return to traditional academic curriculum

1.2.2. 2. Stronger accountability for students and schools

1.3. Education and the American Dream

1.3.1. 1. A meritocratic selection process that ensures the most motivated students will be most benefited in both school and life

1.3.2. 2. The deterioration of the educational system due to progressive reforms

1.4. Perspective

1.4.1. 1. Conservative

1.4.2. 2. The Reagan Philosophy

1.4.3. 3. Focus on the Individual

1.5. Vision

1.5.1. 1. Traditional

1.5.2. 2. Transfer of the Traditional Values of the United States

1.5.3. 3. Hard work, family unity, individual initiative

1.6. The Role of the School

1.6.1. 1. The schools give the students what they need in order to be successful if the student applies themselves and puts forth an effort.

1.6.2. 2. Celebrities that have overcome the odds and were successful due to hard work and perserverence. http://www.alleducationschools.com/education-careers/special-education/famous-people-disabilities/

1.6.3. 3. Essential to both economic productivity and social stability.

2. History of U.S Education

2.1. The Common School

2.1.1. 1. Free publically funded schools

2.1.2. 2. "The great equalizer of the conditions of men"

2.2. Democratic-Liberal School

2.2.1. 1. Equality of opportunity for all

2.2.2. 2. Rejection of the privileged

2.2.3. 3. U.S higher education- "part of the genius of American education"

2.3. Public High School

2.3.1. 1. The purpose of education

2.3.2. 2. Modern academia and traditional subjects

2.4. Education for Women and African-Americans

2.4.1. 1. Traditional roles of women

2.4.2. 2. Mount Holyoke Seminary

2.4.3. 3. Roberts v. City of Boston

2.4.4. 4. Establishment of historically Black Colleges

2.5. Equality of Opportunity

2.5.1. 1. The GI Bill of Rights

2.5.2. 2. Plessy v. Ferguson

2.5.3. 3. Brown v. Topeka Board of Education

2.6. Educational Reaction and Reform and the Standards Era

2.6.1. 1. A Nation At Risk

2.6.2. 2. Goals 2000

2.6.3. 3. No Child Left Behind

2.6.4. 4. Charter schools

2.6.5. 5. Race to the Top

3. Sociology of Education

3.1. Functional Theories

3.1.1. 1. Interdependence of the Social System

3.1.2. 2. The importance of education for creating moral unity

3.1.3. 3. The importance of education in the development of our culture and society

3.2. Effects of Schooling

3.2.1. 1. Attitude is important because when students have the proper chance to learn they can be changed dramatically.

3.2.2. 2. Employment is so important because the main reason people decide to go to college is to get a good job, if there was no benefit to an education in terms of work, more people wouldn't go.

3.2.3. 3. Education and mobility is an important effect on students because depending on where you go to school can speak volumes about your degree.

3.3. Inside the Schools

3.3.1. 1. Not all students have the same curriculum and this can affect students attending college.

3.3.2. 2. Teacher behavior has a huge impact because when the teacher does not care about the subject or the student, the student will think they are not worth being cared about and not care about the subject either.

3.3.3. 3. Student peer groups are important because based on who you are lumped together with, will effect what you do.

3.4. Education and Inequality

3.4.1. 1. Inadequate schools are big factors because when students have inferior chances surrounding them it will be hard for the to be successful.

3.4.2. 2. Tracking can affect students because they will be put in a category with other people and that will either positively or negatively influence them.

3.4.3. 3. De Facto Segregation has a huge impact on students as well.

3.4.4. 4. Gender discrimination

3.5. Current Educational Crisis

3.5.1. 1. Poverty

3.5.2. 2. "Norms of Society"

3.5.3. 3. Parents and detracking

3.6. Sociology for Teachers

3.6.1. 1. Effective learning environments.

3.6.2. 2. Interaction in the classroom have a huge impact.

3.6.3. 3. Insight into being a better teacher.

4. Philosophy of Education

4.1. Goal of Education

4.1.1. 1. Realism

4.1.2. 2. Apply what they learn to make a better world.

4.1.3. 3. As a historian I believe we can apply the historic lessons to benefit us in the future.

4.2. Method of Institution

4.2.1. 1. Dewey's Pragmatism

4.2.2. 2. Teaching students in a group as well as individually.

4.2.3. 3. A more flexible environment.

4.3. Curriculum

4.3.1. 1. Dewey's Pragmatism

4.3.2. 2. Focus on core curriculum.

4.3.3. 3. Curriculum can change with the students.

4.4. Generic Notions

4.4.1. 1. Idealism

4.4.2. 2. Using the dialectic to discuss difference of opinions to find common ground.

4.4.3. 3. Moving individuals toward achieving the good.

4.5. Key Researchers

4.5.1. 1. Plato-Idealism

4.5.2. 2. Plato and Aristotle- Realism

4.5.3. 3. Dewey- Pragmatism

4.5.4. 4. Kierkegaard- Existentialism

4.5.5. 5. Derrida- Postmodernism

4.6. Role of Teacher

4.6.1. 1. Idealism

4.6.2. 2. Reminiscence in the classroom to bring out of the student what they already have inside.

4.6.3. 3. Be a role model.

5. Schools as Organizations

5.1. Franklin County School District

5.1.1. 1. State Senators Richard Shelby and Jeff Sessions

5.1.2. 2. House Representative Robert Aderholt

5.1.3. 3. State Superintendent Tommy Bice

5.1.4. 4. Representative on State School Board Jeffery Newman

5.1.5. 5. Franklin County Superintendent Gary Williams

5.1.6. 6. Local School Board Members Ralton Baker, Pat Cochran, Shannon Oliver, Mike Shewbart, Terry Welborn

5.2. Great Britain

5.2.1. 1. Highly centralized national curriculum and system of national assessment.

5.2.2. 2. Class, race, and ethnic stratified.

5.2.3. 3. Eliminated comprehensive secondary school.

5.3. France

5.3.1. 1. Dual system educational system.

5.3.2. 2. Competitive educational system.

5.3.3. 3. Slightly more democratic than traditionally.

5.4. Former Soviet Union

5.4.1. 1. Experimental school systems after collapse of the Soviet Union.

5.4.2. 2. Increasingly different than that of the Bolshevik Party.

5.5. Japan

5.5.1. 1. High work ethic.

5.5.2. 2. "Double Schooling" with public schools and non-formal schools.

5.5.3. 3. A strong love for education.

5.6. Germany

5.6.1. 1. Opposite to the United States educational system.

5.6.2. 2. West Germany struggling to handle competitive school system.

5.6.3. 3. Reunification of the German educational system.

5.7. Finland

5.7.1. 1. Strict college standards.

5.7.2. 2. Specific programs for students.

5.7.3. 3. Highly competitive, well paid teachers have time to come up with teaching strategies to be effective.

6. Curriculum and Pedagogy

6.1. Humanist Curriculum

6.1.1. 1. Focused on but not limited to Western heritage.

6.1.2. 2. Focuses on cultural heritage.

6.1.3. 3. Focus on a traditional core of subjects and reading.

6.2. Modern Functionalist Theory

6.2.1. 1. Prepare students for the difficult role of preparing them for modern society.

6.2.2. 2. Changing curriculum to meet the changing world.

6.2.3. 3. It is important to teach students how to learn.

6.3. Curriculum Theory and Practice

6.3.1. 1. William Pinar

6.3.2. 2. Separation of Theory and Practice

6.3.3. 3. The need to balance theory, research and practice.

6.4. The Philosophy of Teaching

6.4.1. 1. Philip Jackson

6.4.2. 2. The mimetic tradition

6.4.3. 3. The transformative tradition

6.5. The Stratification of the Curriculum

6.5.1. 1. The division of the curriculum

6.5.2. 2. Ability grouping and curriculum tracking are important parts of the curriculum straitification system.

6.5.3. 3. The dominant social efficiency model.

6.6. The Effects of the Curriculum

6.6.1. 1. It is hard to separate curriculum effects and parts of life.

6.6.2. 2. Education has an important effect on students.

6.6.3. 3. The noncognitive effects of teaching.

7. Equality of Opportunity

7.1. African American 13 year old Reading Scale Scores

7.1.1. 1. Increase in score from 222 to 247 from 71' til 08'.

7.1.2. 2. Higher increase than any other ethnicity.

7.1.3. 3. A drop in the 90's was changed in the late 90's.

7.2. Coleman Study Response

7.2.1. 1. The location of an individuals school has little impact on their cognitive growth.

7.2.2. 2. Student body composition has a major impact on student learning.

7.2.3. 3. The joining together of student bodies.

7.3. Social Segregation

7.3.1. 1. Schools over the last two decades continue to be segregated.

7.3.2. 2. Racial and ethnic segregation is increasing.

7.3.3. 3. There is a connection to segregation and lower achievement and graduation rates.

7.4. Educational Attainment and Economic Achievment

7.4.1. 1. There is a relationship to a college degree and higher wages.

7.4.2. 2. What is the connection to management positions and college degrees?

7.4.3. 3. College degrees are valuable assets.

7.5. Educational Inequality

7.5.1. 1. The amount of education received is related to their life chances.

7.5.2. 2. Life chances are related to race and gender.

7.5.3. 3. Educational opportunities are related to class structure.

7.6. School Difference and Educational Outcomes

7.6.1. 1. What degree can the outcomes of the students be related to the school system?

7.6.2. 2. The first hypothesis is there is a strong connection between school quality and student achievements.

7.6.3. 3. The second hypothesis is that the school isn't strong enough to undo class background.

8. Educational Inequality

8.1. Functionalists

8.1.1. 1. The foundation of liberal education policy since 1960s.

8.1.2. 2. The schooling process will produce unequal results.

8.1.3. 3. Unequal results do not come from unequal opportunity.

8.2. Cultural Deprivation Theory

8.2.1. 1. Working class and non white students lack the cultural resources such as books to be successful.

8.2.2. 2. Aimed more at the certain kind of culture.

8.2.3. 3. Project head-start was founded.

8.3. School Financing

8.3.1. 1. The comparison to poor schools and suburb schools.

8.3.2. 2. Property values are higher in certain areas and help to contribute more to suburb schools.

8.3.3. 3. The suburb schools are able to provide more per student.

8.4. Do Schools Reproduce Inequality?

8.4.1. 1. School and student teaching observations are not opposed.

8.4.2. 2. The relationship between family and schools.

8.4.3. 3. A smaller part in a larger complex problem.

8.5. The Burden of "Acting White"

8.5.1. 1. A burden that plagues black students.

8.5.2. 2. Sampling Schools.

8.5.3. 3. The classes offered.

8.6. Gender Inequality

8.6.1. 1. The difference in test scores.

8.6.2. 2. The increase of women in college have increased substantially.

8.6.3. 3. Sociocultural change in gender roles.

9. Educational Reform

9.1. Charter Schools

9.1.1. 1. Autonomy for Accountablity

9.1.2. 2. Results based instead of regulations.

9.1.3. 3. No tuition but given a private school feel.

9.2. State Intervention and Mayoral Control

9.2.1. 1. Schools handed over to another authority due to lack of results.

9.2.2. 2. Results show that state takeover still isn't as effective.

9.2.3. 3. Mayoral Control has mixed results based on who you as about effectiveness.

9.3. School Finance Reforms

9.3.1. 1. Financial help to poorer school districts.

9.3.2. 2. Social services, increased security, technology alternative education, school-to-work, after-school and summer-school programs.

9.3.3. 3. Although these seem effective, they need help and can't help education reform alone.

9.4. Full Service and Community Schools

9.4.1. 1. Education of the whole community.

9.4.2. 2. Meets the needs of students and their families.

9.4.3. 3. Canada's Harlem Children's Zone and Newark's Broader Bolder Approach are examples.

9.5. Harlem Children's Zone

9.5.1. 1. Started by Geoffrey Canada to help give kid's a chance in college.

9.5.2. 2. Help's not just students but their entire families by creating more educated people.

9.5.3. 3. Part of KIPP, Knowledge is Power Programs.

9.6. Connecting School, Community, and Societal Reform

9.6.1. 1. Leadership is the Drive For Change

9.6.2. 2. Parent-community ties

9.6.3. 3. Professional capacity

9.6.4. 4. Student-centered learning climate

9.6.5. 5. Instructional Guidance