The Phases of College Instruction

Describing the relevance and relations between the three phases of college Instruction.

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The Phases of College Instruction by Mind Map: The Phases of College Instruction

1. The Pre-Engagement of College Instruction

1.1. Involves those tasks the educator performs in preparation to engage the student in the teachinglearning effort.

1.2. Needs Assessment, Diagnostics, Instructional Objectives, and Task Analysis. Test Development and Selection, Pretesting and grouping, Instructional module development and debugging.

1.2.1. Each category here needs further theoretical elaboration and research. Since every student comes into a college setting with different knowledge levels, and acedemic backgrounds, so students will be ahead of others.

1.3. There are two sets of information the instructor seeks at this point: through the process of needs assessment, he or she seeks information about what the instructional effort is to involve; and through diagnostic activities, he or she seeks information about the participants in the teaching-learning effort that may be relevant for the planning of instruction.

2. The Engagement Phase of College Instruction

2.1. The educator involves the student in the teaching-learning effort.

2.2. Situational Assessment and Final Module Adjustment, Module Implementation, Formative Evaluation and Corrective Activity.

2.2.1. As the course progresses the instructor may have to modify his/her course. The goal of the course however is for the student to do what they have to in order to keep up with the instructor unlike high school where the teacher would do their best move the class along.

2.3. There are two sets of information the instructor seeks at this point: through the process of needs assessment, he or she seeks information about what the instructional effort is to involve; and through diagnostic activities, he or she seeks information about the participants in the teaching-learning effort that may be relevant for the planning of instruction. The educator develops the engagement procedures through which he or she will aid his or her students in their pursuit of the instructional objectives. The educator develops any remediation procedures indicated by diagnostic findings.

3. The Post Engagement of College Instruction

3.1. The educator assesses the effectiveness of the teaching-learning effort he or she has just completed, and he or she makes corrections as necessary to ensure the success of future attempts in the same direction.

3.2. Summative Evaluation, Remediation.

3.2.1. Thereticol evaluation and further research is needed here for students as wel as instructors. this is when both students and instructos hav completed the course, but what is determined next is with how much accuracy and effiency.

3.3. Summative evaluation is used here, is restricted to an appraisal of the success of a specific instructional effort. In this sense of the term, summative evaluation is used pedagogically for the purposes of student, instructor and institutional remediation following completion of the instructional effort.

3.4. Remediation comes into play when problems identified through summative evaluation are judged serious enough to have interfered with learning— and to be likely to continue to do so unless resolved before any further attempts are made at addressing the instructional objectives at hand.

4. References

4.1. Martinez-Pons, Manuel. Continuum Guide to Successful Teaching in Higher Education. London, GBR: Continuum International Publishing, 2003. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 22 September 2014.

5. Educational Psychology Thoughts

5.1. The discipline of educational psychology is broad, addressing such aspects of education as classroom dynamics, student development, learning processes, motivation, instructional methodology, individual differences, measurement theory, and research methodology and the study of language and thought, meta-cognition, discourse structures, strategic instruction, and teacher decision making.

5.2. The discipline of educational psychology is broad, addressing such aspects of education as classroom dynamics, student development, learning processes, motivation, instructional methodology, individual differences, measurement theory, and research methodology (Davis, 1983); and ". . . the study of language and thought, metacognition, discourse structures, strategic instruction, and teacher decision making" (Berliner & Calfee, 1996, p. 7).