CALPURNIA Calpurnia is a strong, independent and important character in the novel. To Jem and Sc...

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CALPURNIA Calpurnia is a strong, independent and important character in the novel. To Jem and Scout, she is a motherly figure and in some ways a teacher. She is wise and respected by both the black and white community. by Mind Map: CALPURNIA  Calpurnia is a strong, independent and important character in the novel. To Jem and Scout, she is a motherly figure and in some ways a teacher.  She is wise and respected by both the black and white community.

1. Appearance

1.1. 'she was all angles and bones; she was near sighted; she squinted; her hand was wide as a bed slat and twice as hard.' - page six

1.1.1. Scout discribes her like this in the beginning of the novel. leaving the impression of her being a wicked stepmother. However we later discover the love Calpurnia has for the children, she just displays it differently.

2. Personality

2.1. 'She was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why i couldn't behave as well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when i wasn't ready to come.' - page six

2.2. 'Our battles were epic and one sided. Calpurnia always won, mainly because Atticus always took her side. She had been with us ever since Jem was born, and i had felt her tyrannical presence as long as i could remember.' - page six

2.3. 'Calpurnia bent down and kissed me. I ran along, wondering what had come over her. She had wanted to make up with me, that was it. She had always been too hard on me, she had at last seen the error of her fractious ways, she was sorry and too stubborn to say so.'

2.4. Lee treats Calpurnia as admirable because she has made the best of her opportunities and has not allowed herself to become bitter. Calpurnia has a sense of self-worth that is not affected by the opinions of people around her. This is a way in which she resembles Atticus.

2.5. Calpurnia is a clever and apt character, who is able to act efficiently in difficult situations. An example of this is when a mad dog was loose on their street. Calpurnia called all the neighbours, notifying them of this. QUOTE: “Calpurnia’s message had been revived by the neighbourhood. Every wood door within our range of vision was closed tight”. This shows that the neighbours trusted her word; therefore proving that she is a capable character, who is able to act in a reasonable manner.

2.6. "Calpurnia rarely commented on the ways of white people" - page 12

2.6.1. this quote demonstrated that white people were inferior to the whites, and therefore Calpurnia feels no right to express her opinion on white matters. This is another demonstration of the injustice in the system.

3. actions

3.1. Double life

3.1.1. Calpurnia acts very differently when she is with the Finch's, in comparison to the way she acts with her friends. When they visit the church, she speaks differently, and Scout says: '"Cal," I asked, "why do you talk nigger-talk to the—to your folks when you know it's not right?"'

3.1.1.1. This shows that Calpurnia does not get the privilege of being herself, regardless of where she is and who she is with. Instead, she has to live a double life in order to fit in. This demonstrates the theme of conformity, where Calpurnia feels as if she has to conform to the standard, or a certain expectation, as different people have different expectations. Throughout the novel, the actions and thoughts of white people often differed from the actions of black people. Some of the Finches' white friends look down on Calpurnia as a servant and are shocked to hear Atticus speak freely in her presence. At the same time, some members of Calpurnia's black church are very critical of her being on such friendly terms with her white employer. Calpurnia lives a divided life.

3.2. Calpurnia doesn't know her own birthday, it is obvious that she didn't have an extravagant upringing, so she had to work hard to get where she is

3.3. She has a strong sense of justice and fairness, similar to Atticus. When scout questions Walter Cunningham's actions (page 27) she becomes 'erratic'. 'there's some folks who don't eat like us' she whispered fiercely, 'but you and called on to contradict em' at the table when they don't. That's boys yo' comp'ny and if he wants to eat up the table cloth you let him, you hear?'

3.4. Calpurnia is respected in the community for example, when the mad dog was loose on the street scout quotes 'Calpurnia’s message had been revived by the neighborhood. Every wood door within our range of vision was closed tight”

4. Role

4.1. the white commpunity

4.1.1. Can speak correct English

4.1.2. She learned to read and write from old law books

4.1.3. she is the children's bridge between the black and white world

4.1.3.1. That Calpurnia led a modest double life never dawned on me. The idea that she had a separate existence outside our household was a novel one, to say nothing of her having command of two languages. (12.138)

4.2. Black Community

4.2.1. members of Calpurnia's black church are very critical of her being on such friendly terms with her white employer.

4.2.2. at church she shifts who she is and speaks her friends dialect so they will not feel she is trying to act superior to them.

4.2.2.1. QUOTE: "It's right hard to say," she said. "Suppose you and Scout talked colored-folks' talk at home it'd be out of place, wouldn't it? Now what if I talked white-folks' talk at church, and with my neighbors? They'd think I was puttin' on airs to beat Moses."

4.3. Scout and Jem

4.3.1. She acts like a motherly figure to the children and disciplinarian

4.3.1.1. QUOTE: "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty! Yo' folks might be better'n the Cunninghams but it don't count for nothin' the way you're disgracin' 'em—if you can't act fit to eat at the table you can just set here and eat in the kitchen!" Calpurnia sent me through the swinging door to the diningroom with a stinging smack. Chapter 3 (pg. 26-29)

4.4. Atticus

4.4.1. Atticus trusts Calpurnia, relies on her for support raising his children, and considers her part of the family.

5. quotes

5.1. "It's right hard to say," she said. "Suppose you and Scout talked colored-folks' talk at home it'd be out of place, wouldn't it? Now what if I talked white-folks' talk at church, and with my neighbors? They'd think I was puttin' on airs to beat Moses."

5.1.1. Calpurnia knows her place, knows what she has to do to fit into the 'status quo', she knows how to please the people around her

5.2. "Baby,' said Calpurnia, 'I just can't help it if Mister Jem's growin' up. He's gonna want to be off to himself a lot now, doin' whatever boys do, so you just come right on in the kitchen when you feel lonesome. We'll find lots of things to do in here.'"

5.2.1. Calpurnia is caring and understanding, she wants scout to be happy

5.3. 'Alexandra, Calpurnia's not leaving this house until she wants to. You may think otherwise, but I couldn't have got along without her all these years. She's a faithful member of this family and you'll simply have to accept things the way they are. Besides, sister, I don't want you working your head off for us- you've no reason to do that. We still need Cal as much as we ever did.'

5.3.1. Calpurnia is respected by Atticus and appreciated greatly, he stands up for her.

5.4. _[Lula] "You ain’t got no business bringin‘ white chillun here—they got their church, we got our’n. It is our church, ain’t it, Miss Cal?" __[Calpurnia] "It’s the same God, ain’t it?"

5.4.1. Calpurnia believes in equal rights and justice

5.5. "Calpurnia bent down and kissed me. I ran along, wondering what had come over her. She had wanted to make up with me, that was it. She had always been too hard on me, she had at last seen the error of her fractious ways, she was sorry and too stubborn to say so."

5.5.1. Calpurnia is protective of the children, and loves them dearly even they they don't think so

5.6. "... I don't think the children've suffered one bit from her having brought them up. If anything, she's been harder on them in some ways than a mother would have been... she's never let them get away with anything, and she's never indulged them... and another thing, the children love her."

5.6.1. she is a faithful member of the family

6. INTERACTIONS

6.1. Calpurnia is the housekeeper for the Finch's. The Finch's house is a place where everyone is treated equally, including Calpurnia. In comparison to the way most white people treat black people in this novel, Calpurnia is respected and treated fairly in the Finch's house.

6.2. Calpurnia is a character who encourages Scout and Jem to treat people with compassion. Her values of life and respect stayed constant. One example is, when Walter Cunningham comes home and pours molasses all over his dinner. She pulled Scout out, into the kitchen, from the diner, and taught her how to respect and be her guests, and to not treat them as if they are inferior. Scout says: "He's not company, he's just a Cunningham." Calpurnia acts indignantly in response to Scout's statement. She says: "Don't matter who they are, anybody who sets foot in this house is your company and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty." Calpurnia is a virtuous character who teaches Scout valuable lessons, which later benefit her mindset.

6.3. Calpurnia shows her love to Scout in many occasions. She often gives Scout and Jem tough love, as she is stern with them. However, occasionally, the benign side of her shows. An example of this is in the novel, where it states: "Calpurnia bent down and kissed me. I ran along, wondering what had come over her. She had wanted to make up with me, that was it. She had always been too hard on me, she had at last seen the error of her fractious ways, she was sorry and too stubborn to say so."This demonstrates a time where Calpurnia showed compassion to Scout, without rebuking her.

6.4. In response to Aunt Alexandra imposing her views on Atticus, in regards to Calpurnia, Atticus says: "Calpurnia's not leaving this house ... until she wants to. She's a faithful member of this family and you'll simply have to accept things the way they are."Calpurnia is a significant part of the Finch's family, as she is an asset to the family.

6.5. Calpurnia gives Scout a perspective about Jem's personality changes when she says to Scout: "I just can't help it if Mister Jem's growin' up. He's gonna want to be off to himself a lot now, doin' whatever boys do, so you just come right on in the kitchen when you feel lonesome. We'll find lots of things to do in here." This shows that she acts as a companion towards Scout and she is open-minded, in regards to the behavioural development of Jem and Scout.