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Application Services Library 2 (ASL®2) study guide mind map by Mind Map: Application Services Library 2 (ASL®2) study guide mind map

1. ASL®2 Fundamentals

1.1. Standard / model / process framework and library (of knowledge) for the implementation of application management (AM)

1.2. Vendor independent

1.3. Public domain library

1.4. Aims to professionalize the application management function

1.5. The framework is promoted and supported by the ASL BiSL Foundation and sponsored by both IT service providers and user organizations that benefit from sharing their best practices and using a knowledge platform for application management.

1.5.1. www.aslbislfoundation.org

2. IT Management Domains

2.1. Loojen and Delen's model

2.2. IT management domains are “inextricably linked”

2.3. Business Information Management (BIM)

2.3.1. User / organizational perspectives

2.3.2. focus

2.3.2.1. Information provisioning

2.3.3. Managerial aspects

2.3.4. System owner & business information managers

2.3.5. Business information management / contract management

2.4. IT infrastructure Management (ITIM)

2.4.1. Production perspective

2.4.2. focus

2.4.2.1. Information technology

2.4.3. Technical aspects

2.4.4. Data center

2.4.5. Operation / renewal

2.5. Application Management (AM)

2.5.1. Maintenance perspective

2.5.2. focus

2.5.2.1. Information systems & applications (applications & data)

2.5.3. Focused on IT solutions

2.5.4. Maintenance organization / application development

2.5.5. Application operation & change / development

2.5.6. ASL® standard is dedicated to this domain

3. ASL®2 Processes (26)

3.1. Processes characteristics

3.1.1. Processes are inside clusters.

3.1.2. Each process is inside exactly one cluster.

3.1.3. Processes communicate to each other (within and outside the cluster)

3.1.4. Each process has it's goals, activities, inputs, outputs and relationships with other processes

3.2. Operational Level

3.2.1. Application Support cluster (has 4 processes)

3.2.1.1. Use Support process

3.2.1.1.1. process goals

3.2.1.1.2. activities

3.2.1.1.3. process relationships with Supplier / Customer or other processes / clusters

3.2.1.2. Configuration Management process

3.2.1.2.1. process goals

3.2.1.2.2. activities

3.2.1.2.3. process relationships with Supplier / Customer or other processes / clusters

3.2.1.3. IT Operation Management process

3.2.1.3.1. process goals

3.2.1.3.2. activities

3.2.1.3.3. process relationships with Supplier / Customer or other processes / clusters

3.2.1.4. Continuity Management process

3.2.1.4.1. process goals

3.2.1.4.2. activities

3.2.1.4.3. process relationships with Supplier / Customer or other processes / clusters

3.2.2. Connecting Processes Operational Level cluster (has 2 processes)

3.2.2.1. Change Management process

3.2.2.1.1. process goals

3.2.2.1.2. activities

3.2.2.2. Software Control and Distribution process

3.2.2.2.1. process goals

3.2.2.2.2. activities

3.2.3. Application Maintenance and Renewal cluster (has 5 processes)

3.2.3.1. Impact Analysis process

3.2.3.1.1. process goals

3.2.3.1.2. activities

3.2.3.2. Design process

3.2.3.2.1. process goals

3.2.3.2.2. activities

3.2.3.3. Realization process

3.2.3.3.1. process goals

3.2.3.3.2. activities

3.2.3.4. Testing process

3.2.3.4.1. process goals

3.2.3.4.2. activities

3.2.3.5. Implementation process

3.2.3.5.1. process goals

3.2.3.5.2. activities

3.3. Managing Level

3.3.1. Management Processes cluster (has 5 processes)

3.3.1.1. Contract Management process

3.3.1.1.1. process goals

3.3.1.1.2. activities

3.3.1.2. Planning and Control process

3.3.1.2.1. process goals

3.3.1.2.2. activities

3.3.1.3. Quality Management process

3.3.1.3.1. process goals

3.3.1.3.2. activities

3.3.1.4. Financial Management process

3.3.1.4.1. process goals

3.3.1.4.2. activities

3.3.1.5. Supplier Management process

3.3.1.5.1. process goals

3.3.1.5.2. activities

3.4. Strategic Level

3.4.1. Application Management Organization Strategy cluster (has 5 processes)

3.4.1.1. Account and Market Definition process

3.4.1.1.1. process goals

3.4.1.1.2. activities

3.4.1.2. Capabilities Definition process

3.4.1.2.1. process goals

3.4.1.2.2. activities

3.4.1.3. Technology Definition process

3.4.1.3.1. process goals

3.4.1.3.2. activities

3.4.1.4. Supplier Definition process

3.4.1.4.1. process goals

3.4.1.4.2. activities

3.4.1.5. Service Delivery Definition process

3.4.1.5.1. process goals

3.4.1.5.2. activities

3.4.2. Application Strategy cluster (has 5 processes)

3.4.2.1. IT Developments Strategy process

3.4.2.1.1. process goals

3.4.2.1.2. activities

3.4.2.2. Customer Organizations Strategy process

3.4.2.2.1. process goals

3.4.2.2.2. activities

3.4.2.3. Customer Environment Strategy processs

3.4.2.3.1. process goals

3.4.2.3.2. activities

3.4.2.4. Application Lifecycle Management process

3.4.2.4.1. process goals

3.4.2.4.2. activities

3.4.2.5. Application Portfolio Management process

3.4.2.5.1. process goals

3.4.2.5.2. activities

4. ASL®2 Clusters (6)

4.1. Clusters characteristics

4.1.1. ASL®2 framework consists of various processes grouped together in 6 clusters.

4.1.2. Clusters communicate to each other through processes.

4.1.3. Each cluster resides in exactly one layer.

4.1.4. Each cluster resides in exactly one perspective.

4.1.4.1. Exception is Management Processes cluster which resides in two perspectives.

4.2. Operational Level

4.2.1. Application Support cluster

4.2.1.1. cluster goals

4.2.1.1.1. The goal of the Application Support cluster is to ensure that the applications – in their current state – are optimally applied to support of the business processes using the minimum resources and with the least possible operational disrupting.

4.2.1.1.2. The Application Support cluster processes aim to ensure that the current applications support the business with a minimum of resources and operational distortions.

4.2.1.2. cluster statements

4.2.1.2.1. Separate AM processes are needed to support the use of applications

4.2.1.2.2. These processes have numerous interfaces with similar processes within ITIM and BIM

4.2.1.2.3. There is no direct one-on-one relationship between these processes

4.2.1.3. key question

4.2.1.3.1. Are the applications running and working properly?

4.2.1.4. The processes within this cluster have as well been defined in the ITIL

4.2.2. Connecting Processes Operational Level cluster

4.2.2.1. cluster goals

4.2.2.1.1. The Connecting Processes - Operational Level cluster ensure the synchronization between the application support processes and the application maintenance and renewal processes.

4.2.2.1.2. The Connecting Processes - Operational Level cluster processes deploy changed software and data from application maintenance and renewal to application support.

4.2.2.2. cluster statements

4.2.2.2.1. Synchronization of the application support and the application maintenance and renewal. The ‘logistics’ within application management

4.2.2.2.2. Complexity and necessity has increased due to the growth in complexity of services and the increased use of standard solutions

4.2.2.3. key question

4.2.2.3.1. How are support, and maintenance and renewal of applications synchronized?

4.2.3. Application Maintenance and Renewal cluster

4.2.3.1. cluster goals

4.2.3.1.1. The goal of Application Maintenance and Renewal cluster is to ensure that the applications are adapted to suit the changing demands and wishes resulting from changes in the environment and business processes.

4.2.3.1.2. The Application Maintenance and Renewal cluster processes are similar to application development.

4.2.3.1.3. A major part of the work of Application Management deals with designing, programming and testing applications and information systems.

4.2.3.2. cluster statements

4.2.3.2.1. Maintenance and renewal follows the phasing and processes of application development

4.2.3.2.2. Much smaller degree of freedom and the demands are also higher. Maintainability is important but few opportunities arise to improve this

4.2.3.2.3. Development and maintenance take place in a more component-based world. Alignment with the environment is becoming more important

4.2.3.3. key question

4.2.3.3.1. How will the applications be modified to suit changing demands?

4.3. Managing Level

4.3.1. Management Processes cluster

4.3.1.1. cluster goals

4.3.1.1.1. The Management Processes cluster ensure that existing activities are performed according to goals, agreements and chosen strategies.

4.3.1.2. cluster statements

4.3.1.2.1. Market dynamics impact the management processes significantly, therefore agreements with customers need continual evaluation and reassessment

4.3.1.2.2. Management Processes also form the link between operations and policy

4.3.1.3. key question

4.3.1.3.1. Are activities performed according to goals, agreements and strategies?

4.4. Strategic Level

4.4.1. Application Management Organization Strategy cluster

4.4.1.1. cluster goals

4.4.1.1.1. Application Management Organization Strategy cluster aims to ensure that the service organization’s policy and its future are correctly shaped.

4.4.1.1.2. The aim of the Application Management Organization Strategy cluster is to ensure that the service organization’s policy and its future are correctly shaped.

4.4.1.2. cluster statements

4.4.1.2.1. Commercialization of services has resulted in this process becoming vital for the future of the AM organization

4.4.1.2.2. There are many kinds of AM services but AM organizations usually cannot supply multiple kinds of services

4.4.1.2.3. Great need to choose a strategy and form alliances with other organizations

4.4.1.3. key question

4.4.1.3.1. How will application management be positioned and organized in the future?

4.4.2. Application Strategy cluster

4.4.2.1. cluster goals

4.4.2.1.1. The goal of the Application Strategy cluster is development of a long-term strategy for the various application objects forming part of the information provisioning as a whole, for one or multiple organizations.

4.4.2.1.2. There is a clear view needed what the demands are in the future, and based on that, what and how the future of these applications should look like.

4.4.2.2. cluster statements

4.4.2.2.1. Renewal and innovation of the business process will increasingly have to come from existing applications; starting from scratch is becoming less of an option

4.4.2.2.2. Managing the applications as a whole (the portfolio) is becoming an important AM issue

4.4.2.2.3. Understanding of developments in the user organization and environment, and technology is important for alignment with the business

4.4.2.3. key question

4.4.2.3.1. How will the application landscape evolve to fulfill long-term needs?

5. ASL®2 Perspectives (2)

5.1. Services Perspective

5.1.1. Orientation to services offered to external community.

5.1.2. Service oriented aspects.

5.1.3. Focus on provision of services to individuals and organizations.

5.2. Application Perspective

5.2.1. Orientation to applications.

5.2.2. Application oriented aspects.

5.2.3. Focus on supporting business processes and application change management.

6. ASL®2 Levels (3)

6.1. ASL®2 has 3 (horizontal) levels.

6.2. Operational Level

6.2.1. The more or less daily, primary tasks of application management and business information management.

6.2.2. Time dimension

6.2.2.1. today

6.2.3. Actvity

6.2.3.1. Continuously

6.2.4. Has

6.2.4.1. 3 Clusters

6.2.4.2. 11 Processes

6.3. Managing Level

6.3.1. The control of the operational processes, the strategic processes, and the management processes themselves.

6.3.2. Dividing "line" between policies and operations.

6.3.3. Time dimension

6.3.3.1. short-terrn (month, quarter, year)

6.3.4. Actvity

6.3.4.1. Continuously

6.3.5. Has

6.3.5.1. 1 Cluster

6.3.5.2. 5 Processes

6.4. Strategic Level

6.4.1. Designing the future of the applications and the application management organization (ASL®) or the future of the business information management organization or the information provisioning (BiSL®).

6.4.2. Time dimension

6.4.2.1. long-term (next 2-5 years)

6.4.3. Actvity

6.4.3.1. Periodic / On-demand

6.4.4. Has

6.4.4.1. 2 Clusters

6.4.4.2. 10 Processes

7. ASL®2 Official publications

7.1. ASL®2 - A Framework for Application Management

7.1.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087533137

7.1.2. Published: 2011

7.1.3. Pages: 236

7.1.4. http://www.amazon.com/ASL2-Framework-Application-Management-Practice/dp/9087533136

7.1.5. The most important, key position on ASL®2 preparing for Foundation exam.

7.2. ASL®2 Self-assessment

7.2.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087537401

7.2.2. Published: 21/03/2014

7.2.3. Pages: 42

7.2.4. http://www.aslbislbookshop.nl/category/books/9789087537401/ASL%C2%AE2_Self-assessment_(english_version)?publisher=1

7.3. ASL®2: A Pocket Guide

7.3.1. ISBN-13: 978-9087536435

7.3.2. Publisher: 2013

7.3.3. 152 pages

7.3.4. http://www.amazon.com/ASL-2-A-Pocket-Guide/dp/9087536437

8. ASL®2 Official resources

8.1. ASL®2 sample exams, available online

8.1.1. ASL®2 Foundation

8.1.1.1. http://online.apmg-exams.com/index.aspx?subid=82&masterid=17

8.2. ASL®2 White Papers

8.2.1. ASL 2, An introduction

8.2.2. ITIL® v3 and ASL - Sound Guidance for Application Management and Application Development

8.3. ASL®2 website

8.3.1. http://www.aslbislfoundation.org/en/asl

9. ASL®2 standard consists of: 3 Levels, 2 Perspectives, 1 Model, 6 Clusters, 26 Processes, 1 Framework and 1 Maturity Model.

9.1. Application Services Library 2 (ASL®2) logo

9.2. Application Services Library 2 (ASL®2) is mainteined and developed by ASL BiSL Foundation from Netherlands

9.2.1. http://www.aslbislfoundation.org/

10. ASL®2 Maturity Model

10.1. 6 Levels of maturity

10.1.1. Level 0 - Absent

10.1.2. Level 1 - Initial

10.1.2.1. The organization has no stable environment to implement the ASL 2 framework processes. Nevertheless, certain process activities are implemented. Initiatives are also taken and sometimes activities are carried out in order to gain better insight and knowledge. The results and the outcomes of those activities, however, are not always predictable.

10.1.3. Level 2 - Repeatable

10.1.3.1. The organization performs its activities based on repetition. Previous experiences and approaches often form the basis of the performance. This is where a standard way of working begins to emerge, providing several options for managing activities. Managing the activities is generally based upon expectations and outcomes.

10.1.4. Level 3 - Defined and managed

10.1.4.1. Activities and processes are visible, defined and documented. The way processes take their course is clearly defined. In addition, the processes are implemented in such a way that there are quantitative and qualitative experience ratings on which the organization can base and/or adapt the management of those processes.

10.1.5. Level 4 - Optimizing

10.1.5.1. The organization has a continuous cycle of process improvement. Various mechanisms and processes have been developed in order to be able to improve processes on a continuous and managed basis. Improvement and renewal of processes is embedded within the organization.

10.1.6. Level 5 - Chain

10.1.6.1. The focus of the organization relating to the implementation, improvement and fine-tuning of processes, is upon increasing the added value within the process chain in which the organization operates. So, the focus, importance and perspective are not just aimed internally within the organization, but at the entire context of its position in the environment. The key objective here is optimizing the added value for all parties within the process chain.

11. ASL®2 Exams

11.1. Using this mind map and official ASL®2 Glossary you can by yourself prepare and pass in first try ASL®2 Foundation exam.

11.1.1. Foundation exam as name suggests is a basic level, introduction certification. Exam is based only on theory and requires no experience in Application Service Management.

11.1.2. Practitioner exam is under development.

11.2. Preparing for an ASL®2 Foundation exam is also possible through self-study (completing an accredited training is not required prerequisite for certification). Registration for the so called public exam is through the website of APMG-International.

11.2.1. http://www.apmg-international.com/en/exams/public-exams.aspx

12. ASL®2 can be seen as a layered framework with 4 separate layers.

12.1. Download print-ready ASL®2 A3 poster, variant #1 (PDF)

12.2. Download print-ready ASL®2 A3 posters, varian #2 (PDF)

13. Interactive ASL®2 Glossary

13.1. Interactive ASL®2 Glossary

14. This freeware, non-commercial interactive mind map (aligned with the newest version of ASL®) was carefully hand crafted with passion and love for learning and constant improvement as well for promotion the standard and framework ASL® and as a learning tool for candidates wanting to gain ASL® qualification. (please share, like and give feedback - your feedback and comments are my main motivation for further elaboration. THX!)

14.1. Questions / issues / errors? What do you think about my work? Your comments are highly appreciated. Feel free to visit my website: www.miroslawdabrowski.com

14.1.1. http://www.miroslawdabrowski.com

14.1.2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/miroslawdabrowski

14.1.3. https://www.google.com/+MiroslawDabrowski

14.1.4. https://play.spotify.com/user/miroslawdabrowski/

14.1.5. https://twitter.com/mirodabrowski

14.1.6. miroslaw_dabrowski

15. ASL®2 - A public domain standard (not methodology), process framework, model and library from Netherlands. ASL®2 is dedicated to application management (supply side). ASL is closely connected to BiSL® standard and AXELOS® ITIL® best practices and is seen as a complementary extension.

15.1. 1996

15.1.1. Development of the ITIL-inspired R2C framework for supply-side application management by the privatized Dutch Computer Center, RCC

15.2. 1997

15.2.1. Development of FBM, a similar framework for demand-side information management, published in 1998

15.3. 2000

15.3.1. Expansion of R2C with strategic processes and rebranding as ASL® in 2001

15.3.1.1. ASL® emerged from R2C standard. First version of ASL® was published in 2000 as public domain standard.

15.4. 2000

15.4.1. Expansion of FBM with strategic processes

15.5. 2002

15.5.1. Transfer of stewardship of ASL from Roccade to the new not-for-profit ASL Foundation

15.6. 2004

15.6.1. Rebranding of ASL Foundation as ASL BiSL Foundation

15.7. 2009

15.7.1. First revision of ASL®: ASL®2

15.7.1.1. Second and current version was published in 2009. The framework has not radically changed since the first publication.

15.8. 2011

15.8.1. ASL® Foundation & BiSL® Foundation recognized as priSM credentials

15.9. see BiSL® mind map

15.10. see ITIL® mind map