Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

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Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) by Mind Map: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)

1. Types & Attributes

1.1. xMOOC

1.1.1. Passive Learning

1.1.2. Behavioralism

1.1.3. Knowledge Duplication

1.1.4. Sage on Stage

1.1.5. Assessments by External or Peer Evaluations

1.1.6. Large External Funders

1.2. cMOOC

1.2.1. Active Learning

1.2.2. Connectivism

1.2.3. Knowledge Integration

1.2.4. Co-learner Relationship Between Teacher and Learner

1.2.5. Self-Assessment

1.2.6. Inconsistent Funding Sources

1.3. PD-MOOC

1.3.1. Professional Development Focus

1.3.2. Furthering Skill Base

1.4. pMOOC

1.4.1. Active Learning

1.4.2. Constructivism

1.4.3. Teacher as Guide

1.4.4. Knowledge Production

1.4.5. Self and Client Assesement

1.4.6. Moderate Client Funding

1.5. Flipped MOOC

1.5.1. Gamification

1.5.2. Learning Analytics

1.5.3. Personalized Learning Experience

1.5.4. Engaging

1.5.5. Interactive

1.5.6. Flipped Classroom Methodology

2. Some of the First Creators

2.1. George Siemens

2.2. Dave Cormier

2.3. Stephens Downes

2.4. Institutions

2.4.1. Harvard

2.4.2. M.I.T.

2.4.3. Stanford

3. Business Models

3.1. Free

3.2. Pay For Credit

3.3. Pay for Course Enhancement

3.4. Pay for Certification of Completion

3.5. Course Entry Fee

3.6. Pay for Assessments and Graded Work

3.7. Advertiser Supported

3.8. User Data (revenue from) Supported

3.9. Pay for Ancillary Services

3.10. Membership Fee

3.11. Revenue Sharing

4. Issues & Quality

4.1. Accreditation

4.2. Plagiarism

4.3. True Measurement of Engagement

4.4. English Language Dominated

4.5. Heavily Western Perspective

4.6. Transfer of MOOC Credit to Traditional Institution

4.7. Equity of Access

4.8. Inappropriate Use of Copyrighted Materials

4.9. Minimal Application of Instructional Design Principals

5. Participation Patterns

5.1. Similar to Social Networks

5.2. Unconnected Floaters

5.3. Connected Lurkers

5.4. Connected Participants

5.5. Active Contributors

6. Providers

6.1. edX

6.2. Coursera

6.3. Udemy

6.4. Udacity

6.5. FutureLearn

6.6. NovoEd

6.7. Iversity

6.8. Goodwill

6.9. Open2Study

6.10. SWAYAM

7. Design Principles

7.1. Plan ahead

7.2. Build in opportunities for feedback

7.3. Create interactivity

7.4. Provide variation and choice

7.5. Combine async and sync elements

7.6. Segment videos and components

7.7. Design responsive interactive communities

7.8. Include self and team reflection

7.9. Include weekly recaps and updates

8. Benefits

8.1. Just in time learning

8.2. Affordable

8.3. Democratization of education

8.4. Access to top professors

8.5. Culturally diverse learning opportunities for students and instructors

8.6. Develops instructor's skills