Infectious Diseases (Viral infections)

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Infectious Diseases (Viral infections) by Mind Map: Infectious Diseases  (Viral infections)

1. Verruca vulgaris

1.1. Etiology

1.1.1. A human papillovirus, most commonly HPV type 2

1.2. Description

1.2.1. white, papillary, exophytic lesion resembling a papilloma usually found in the lips, but can also be found on the skin of children and adults

1.3. Diagnosis

1.3.1. Microscopic

1.4. Prognosis

1.4.1. Good

1.5. Treatment

1.5.1. Surgical excision, immunologic staining to identify presence of papillomavirus

2. Condyloma acuminatum

2.1. Etiology

2.1.1. A human Papillovirus usually HPV type 6 and 11

2.2. Description

2.2.1. Pink, papillary lesion that is usually more diffused than verruca vulgaris, Found in the oral mucosa of adults

2.3. Diagnosis

2.3.1. Microscopic

2.4. Prognosis

2.4.1. Good

2.5. Treatment

2.5.1. Surgical excision, recurrence is common

3. Multifocal epithelial hyperplasia

3.1. Etiology

3.1.1. HPV type 13 and 32

3.2. Description

3.2.1. Multiple white to pale pink nodules that are distributed throughout the oral mucosa in children

3.3. Diagnosis

3.3.1. Clinical, Microscopic

3.4. Prognosis

3.4.1. Good

3.5. Treatment

3.5.1. Does not require treatment, lesions heal spontaneously weeks to months

4. Primary herpetic gingivostomatitis

4.1. Etiology

4.1.1. Herpes simplex virus, most are type 1 some are type 2

4.2. Description

4.2.1. multiple tiny vesicles that form painful ulcers that are red, and painful. It occurs in the lips, gingival and oral mucosa, generally found in children.

4.3. Diagnosis

4.3.1. Clinical, Microscopic

4.4. Prognosis

4.4.1. Good

4.5. Treatment

4.5.1. None, lesions heal on their own in 1-2 weeks spontaneously.

5. Recurrent herpes simplex infection

5.1. Etiology

5.1.1. Herpes simplex virus

5.2. Description

5.2.1. Tiny vesicles that merge together to form a single ulcer, found on vermillion of lips, hard pate and gingiva of adolescents and adults

5.3. Diagnosis

5.3.1. Clinical

5.4. Prognosis

5.4.1. Good

5.5. Treatment

5.5.1. antiviral drugs such as acyclovir but not for intraoral lesions. No treatment may be given

6. Chickenpox

6.1. Etiology

6.1.1. Varicella-zoster virus

6.2. Description

6.2.1. vesicular and pustular eruptions usually in the skin of children, less common in adolescents and adults

6.3. Diagnosis

6.3.1. Clinical

6.4. Prognosis

6.4.1. Good

6.5. Treatment

6.5.1. None, it heals in 2-3 weeks

7. Herpes zoster

7.1. Etiology

7.1.1. Varicella-zoster virus

7.2. Description

7.2.1. painful vesicles on one side of body along a sensory nerve

7.3. Diagnosis

7.3.1. Clinical

7.4. Prognosis

7.4.1. Good

7.5. Treatment

7.5.1. Antiviral agents, corticosteroids

8. Infectious mononucleosis

8.1. Etiology

8.1.1. Epstein-Barr virus

8.2. Description

8.2.1. Palatal petechiae, sore throat, fever, malaise, fatigue, enlarged spleen, and generalized lymphadenopathy usually in young children and adults

8.3. Diagnosis

8.3.1. Laboratory

8.4. Prognosis

8.4.1. Good

8.5. Treatment

8.5.1. None, usually heals by itself in 4-6 weeks

9. Herpangina

9.1. Etiology

9.1.1. A coxsackievirus

9.2. Description

9.2.1. Vesicles on soft palate and tonsillar area, fever, mild headache. Occurs in children

9.3. Diagnosis

9.3.1. Clinical

9.4. Prognosis

9.4.1. Good

9.5. Treatment

9.5.1. None, usually resolves in less than 1 week

10. Hand-foot-and-mouth disease

10.1. Etiology

10.1.1. A coxsackievirus

10.2. Description

10.2.1. Vesicles anywhere in the mouth, can also occur in the feet, hands and fingers of children under 5

10.3. Diagnosis

10.3.1. Cllinical

10.4. Prognosis

10.4.1. Good

10.5. Treatment

10.5.1. None. Lesions resolve in 2 weeks

11. Acute lymphonodular pharyngitis

11.1. Etiology

11.1.1. A coxsackievirus

11.2. Description

11.2.1. Oral lesions in the soft palate and tonsillar area, accompanied by fever, mild headache and sore throat in children

11.3. Diagnosis

11.3.1. Clinical

11.4. Prognosis

11.4.1. Good

11.5. Treatment

11.5.1. None, usually lasts several days to 2 weeks

12. Measles

12.1. Etiology

12.1.1. A paramyxovirus

12.2. Description

12.2.1. koplik spots,red macules with white necrotic centers most commonly in children

12.3. Diagnosis

12.3.1. Clinical

12.4. Prognosis

12.4.1. Good

12.5. Treatment

12.5.1. None, it heals spontaneously

13. Mumps

13.1. Etiology

13.1.1. A paramyxovirus

13.2. Description

13.2.1. Painful,bilateral enlargement of salivary glands most commonly occurs in children

13.3. Diagnosis

13.3.1. Clinical

13.4. Prognosis

13.4.1. Good

13.5. Treatment

13.5.1. None, it heals spontaneously

14. HIV/AIDS

14.1. Etiology

14.1.1. Immune deficiency from infection of human immunodeficiency virus

14.2. Description

14.2.1. oral candiadiasis, hairy leukoplakia, papillomavirus lesions, kaposi sarcoma, lymphoma, major aphthouslike ulcers, xerostemia, etc. may occur in newborns to adults

14.3. Diagnosis

14.3.1. Laboratory, Microscopic

14.4. Prognosis

14.4.1. Good

14.5. Treatment

14.5.1. Combination of antiretroviral agents, and management of specific opportunistic disease